Web2 domain NFTs.com sells for $15 million to undisclosed buyer

Quick Take

  • The domain name NFTs.com has sold for $15 million – one of the highest publicly recorded domain name sales of all time. 
  • The move comes as the market for web3 domains hots up. 

The domain name NFTs.com has sold for a reported $15 million – a price tag that makes it one of the most expensive domain name sales of all time. 

According to a press release, the deal, announced on Wednesday, was brokered for an undisclosed buyer by teams at URL brokers Domainer and GoDaddy.com, and facilitated by Escrow.com. The sale size is second only to the sale of domain name Voice.com, which was bought by a crypto firm in 2019 for $30 million. 

No formal plans have been announced about what will be hosted on NFTs.com, Domainer said, adding that the buyer has "associations with other web3 projects, such as DigitalArtists.com, which offers a curated web3 service to artists."

The news comes as the market for so-called web3 domain names hots up. While no sale has yet matched up to the dizzying heights of web2 domain names, Ethereum Name Service (ENS) domain names routinely sell for tens of thousands of dollars. In July, sony.eth sold for $72,000 to sunnybay.eth, a pseudonymous ENS collector. Earlier that month, the domain 000.eth was purchased for 300 ETH (worth $315,000 at the time), making it the second-largest sale measured in both ether and dollars.

The biggest sale so far of an ENS domain was for paradigm.eth, which was purchased in October 2021 for 420 ETH (about $1.5 million at the time). Despite the name, crypto investment firm Paradigm reportedly denied that it made the purchase. Plus there were a few other indicators that suggested it might be a prank — albeit a rather expensive one.

Meanwhile, Unstoppable Domains announced in July that it had clinched a $1 billion valuation in its latest fundraise. 


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About Author

Lucy is the NFT, gaming and metaverse editor at The Block. Prior to joining, she worked as a freelancer, with bylines in Wired, Newsweek and The Wall Street Journal, among other publications.